Kidney Disease Center
En Español (Spanish Version)

General Overview
The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs in the lower back. Their main function is to remove waste from the body and to balance the water and electrolyte content of the blood by filtering the salt and water in the blood. In a diseased state, either of these processes may become compromised.

Diagnostic and Surgical Procedures
Living With Kidney Disease



Most types of kidney disease are irreversible, but lowering the burden on the kidneys will slow further deterioration. Keeping yourself in the best general health will help keep you in the best health possible.

Diets to help treat kidney disease:

Preventing Kidney Disease

Calcium helps reduce your risk for these serious health conditions: high blood pressure, heart disease, kidney stones, and possibly colon cancer. Learn more here.

 
Preventing Kidney Disease (Continued)

If you have kidney disease, you may need to limit the potassium in your diet. Read more to find out how.


Copper is a trace mineral that is essential for human health. It works with enzymes, which are proteins that aid in the biochemical reactions of every cell. If you have kidney disease you may need more copper in your diet. Read more here about copper.

Special Topics

Gout is recurrent attacks of joint inflammation caused by a build up of uric acid crystals. If the crystals accumulate in the kidneys, kidney stones may result. Learn more about gout here.


Medications are the primary treatment for gout. There are a number of medications used to treat gout. Learn about the medications here.

Related Conditions
Resources
National Kidney Foundation

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases




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