Treatments for Stomach Cancer
En Español (Spanish Version)

While standard protocols have been established for the treatment of virtually all cancers, physicians will often modify them for their individual patients. These modifications are based on many factors including the patient’s age, general health, desired results, and the specific characteristics of his or her cancer.

The treatment of stomach cancer attempts to cure the cancer or to stop the spread or progression of the cancer.

Existing treatment protocols have been established and continue to be modified through clinical trials. These research studies are essential to determine whether or not new treatments are both safe and effective. Since highly effective treatments for many cancers remain unknown, numerous clinical trials are always underway around the world. You may wish to ask your doctor if you should consider participating in a clinical trial. You can find out about clinical trials at the government web site ClinicalTrials.gov .




References:
Cecil Textbook of Medicine. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Company; 2002: 738-741.

Conn’s Current Therapy 2002. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Company; 2002: 527-529.

Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. Philadelphia, PA: WB Saunders Company; 1998: 733-749.

What is stomach cancer? American Cancer Society website. Available at: http://www.cancer.org/ . Accessed December 2002.

What you need to know about stomach cancer. National Cancer Institute website. Available at http://www.cancer.gov/cancerinfo/wyntk/stomach . Accessed December 2002.

Last Reviewed September 2014



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