Cephalosporins
  • Vitamin K - Supplementation Possibly Helpful
En Español (Spanish Version)


These antibiotics work somewhat similarly to penicillin, but have been chemically modified to have a broader spectrum of effect.

Drugs in this family include

  • cefadroxil (Duricef)
  • cephalexin (Cefanex, Keflex, Keftab, Biocef)
  • cephradine (Velosef)
  • cefaclor (Ceclor, Ceclor CD)
  • cefprozil (Cefzil)
  • cefuroxime (Ceftin)
  • loracarbef (Lorabid)
  • cefdinir (Omnicef)
  • cefixime (Suprax)
  • cefpodoxime proxetil (Vantin)
  • ceftibuten (Cedax)
  • and others
Supplementation Possibly Helpful
Like all other antibiotics, cephalosporins might interfere with vitamin K levels by killing vitamin K–producing bacteria in the intestines. In addition, antibiotics in the cephalosporin family may also interfere with the way vitamin K works. 1 For this reason, taking extra vitamin K may be a good idea when using cephalosporins over the long term.




Shils M, et al. (eds.). Modern nutrition in health and disease, 9th ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1999: 1634.
Last Reviewed August 2013



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