Reducing Your Risk of Nutritional Anemia
En Español (Spanish Version)

Guidelines for the prevention of nutritional anemia include the following:

Diet
A diet that meets the dietary guidelines will ordinarily have enough iron, folate, and vitamin B 12 to prevent anemia. Exceptions include women of childbearing age who are well advised to take supplemental iron and folic acid, and preterm infants who are often prescribed iron supplements. Ask your doctor if you should take these supplements.

Regular Check-Ups
A regular physical exam (check-up) often includes a complete blood count, so undergoing regular check-ups can detect nutritional anemia in an early stage.




References:
American Dietetic Association website. Available at: http://www.eatright.org/ .

Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine . 16th ed. McGraw-Hill; 2004.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ .

Last Reviewed September 2013



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