Symptoms of Scleroderma
En Español (Spanish Version)

Scleroderma involves a wide variety of symptoms. In most cases, people first have symptoms that are associated with Raynaud’s phenomenon .

Raynaud's phenomenon causes:

  • Changes in skin color of the fingertips, toes, and nose in response to cold or emotional stress
  • Skin usually turns very white when first exposed to cold, then blue, then very red
  • May be accompanied by pain, tingling, numbness
Scleroderma may cause:

  • Sores or ulcers on the fingers
  • Changes in the skin as areas of affected skin lose hair and become stiff, hard, thick, and shiny
  • Tight skin over face that makes it hard to change expression
  • Skin creases diminish or disappear
  • Whitish bumps of calcium deposits develop under the skin, known as calcinosis
  • Tiny purplish-red blood vessels appear under the skin, known as telangiectasias
  • Arthritis
  • Muscle pain and weakness
  • Dry eyes and mouth, called Sjögren’s syndrome
Scleroderma may cause digestive problems, such as:

Scleroderma may cause lung, heart, and kidney problems, such as:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Abnormal heart rhythms, known as arrhythmias
  • Fainting, known as syncope



References:
Systemic sclerosis. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us . Updated August 5, 2013. Accessed August 8, 2013.

Scleroderma. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Scleroderma/default.asp . Updated August 2012. Accessed August 8, 2013.

What is scleroderma? Scleroderma Foundation website. Available at: http://www.scleroderma.org/site/PageServer?pagename=patients_whatis . Accessed August 8, 2013.

Last Reviewed August 2013



Health Information Library content is provided by EBSCO Publishing, fully accredited by URAC. URAC is an independent, nonprofit health care accrediting organization dedicated to promoting health care quality through accreditation, certification and commendation.

 

This content is reviewed regularly and is updated when new and relevant evidence is made available. This information is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with questions regarding a medical condition.

 

To send comments or feedback to EBSCO's Editorial Team regarding the content please e-mail healthlibrarysupport@ebscohost.com.