Risk Factors for Rosacea
En Español (Spanish Version)

A risk factor is something that increases your chance of getting a disease or condition.

It is possible to develop rosacea with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing rosacea. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.

Common risk factors for rosacea include:

Gender
Women develop rosacea somewhat more frequently than men, although men are more prone to developing severe rosacea. These observations may be due in part to the fact that women are more likely to see a doctor than men. Men are more likely to seek medical attention only after the condition reaches advanced stages.

Age
Rosacea tends to develop in adults between the ages of 30 and 60 years of age. In women, some cases of rosacea occur around the onset of menopause.

Fair Skin
Although rosacea can develop in people of any skin color, it tends to occur most often in people with fair skin.

Family Members With Rosacea
A tendency to develop rosacea may be inherited. It can often be found in several members of the same family.

Ethnic Background
While the disorder can occur in all ethnic groups, it has been found to be prevalent among people of English, Scottish, Scandinavian, and Northern or Eastern European ancestry.




References:
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disorders website. Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov.

National Rosacea Society website. Available at: http://www.rosacea.org/index.php.

Last Reviewed November 2013



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