Reducing Your Risk of Infertility in Men
En Español (Spanish Version)

Not all cases of male infertility can be prevented, but you may be able to reduce your risk by changing some of your behaviors.
  • Avoid using tobacco, marijuana, anabolic steroids, and “recreational” drugs.
  • Avoid excessive use of alcohol.
  • Avoid exposure to harmful chemicals and heavy metals.
  • Protect yourself from sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Avoid prolonged use of drugs with adverse effect on fertility.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Exercise moderately, but not excessively.
  • Avoid testicular injury in sporting events.
  • Wear looser fitting shorts and pants.
  • If you bicycle, try using a softer saddle.

Avoid Using Tobacco, Marijuana, Anabolic Steroids, and Recreational Drugs
Cigarette smoking reduces sperm count and motility and increases the number of abnormal sperm. Smoking also adversely affects hormone levels and may affect the cells in the testes that produce testosterone. Like cigarette smoking, use of marijuana also can adversely affect sperm count, sperm motility, and sperm morphology. It can also reduce plasma testosterone levels. Anabolic steroids influence production of reproductive hormones and can reduce fertility. Use of cocaine also negatively affects sperm parameters as well as the ability of sperm to penetrate cervical mucus. Opiates (heroin, morphine) may reduce fertility in men by altering hormone production.

Avoid Excessive Use of Alcohol
Although moderate alcohol consumption does not affect male fertility, excessive alcohol intake alters hormone levels and reduces sperm count and sperm quality.

Avoid Exposure to Harmful Chemicals and Heavy Metals
Numerous chemicals used in industry or found in the environment as contaminants have been linked to male infertility. These include organochlorine pesticides, dioxins (used to bleach paper products), and vinclozolin (a fungicide used on food). These chemicals are thought to reduce fertility by disrupting hormone function. Avoid exposure to these chemicals whenever possible.

Protect Yourself From Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Unprotected sexual intercourse (intercourse without a condom) increases your risk of developing a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Several STDs, including gonorrhea and chlamydia , often produce no symptoms, especially in men, so you may not know you are infected. Untreated STDs can cause scarring in the sperm-carrying tubes, which reduces the number of sperm in semen and increases the risk of fertility problems. The more sexual partners you have, the greater your chance of contracting an STD. Using condoms and minimizing the number of sexual partners you have will reduce your risk of getting an STD.

Avoid Prolonged Use of Drugs With Adverse Effect on Fertility
There are many medications which could either cause subfertility or infertility. These include the following categories:
  • Antibiotics: erythromycin, tetracycline, sulfasalazine, nitrofurantoin
  • Antihypertensives: alpha blocker, calcium channel blockers, spironolactone
  • Chemotherapy
  • Others: cimetidine, colchicines, allopurinol, minoxidil

Maintain a Healthful Weight
High body fat can alter hormone metabolism. If you are overweight, consult with your doctor or a registered dietitian to find out what weight is healthy for you and to get help in attaining it.

Exercise Moderately, but Not Excessively
Moderate exercise increases sperm production and may have beneficial effects on fertility. However, excessive exercise, such as that performed by long-distance runners, reduces sperm production.

Avoid Testicular Injury in Sporting Events
The testicles are easily damaged during vigorous sporting events or fights. These injuries can cause inflammation that reduces the blood supply to the testicles, which can permanently damage sperm-producing cells.

Wear Loose-Fitting Shorts and Pants
Underwear and clothing that is tight and constricting may reduce blood flow in the groin and adversely affect sperm production.

If You Bicycle, Try Using a Softer Saddle
Certain bicycle seats may cause circulatory and neurologic damage in the groin that can affect erectile function.




References:
Infertility. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php . Updated August 23, 2012. Accessed September 14, 2012.

Reproductive health. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health website. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/repro/ . Accessed September 14, 2012.

Male infertility. American Society for Reproductive Medicine website. Available at: http://www.asrm.org/topics/detail.aspx?id=1331 . Accessed September 14, 2012.

Broderick GA. Bicycle seats and penile blood flow: does the type of saddle matter? Journal of Urology. 1999.

Male risks. Protect your fertility website. Available at: http://www.protectyourfertility.org/malerisks.html . Accessed September 14, 2012.

RESOLVE. The National Infertility Association website. Available at: http://www.resolve.org/. . Accessed September 14, 2012.

Last Reviewed December 2013



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