Other Treatments for Managing Fibromyalgia
En Español (Spanish Version)

Psychological Therapies
There are different types of psychological therapies that are available to treat fibromyalgia . Examples include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)—This is a form of talk therapy that focuses on your thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.
  • Relaxation-based therapy—This includes learning strategies, like meditation, to reduce stress.
  • Biofeedback —During a biofeedback session, a therapist guides you to relax certain muscles or control breathing, while an electronic device shows your body’s response.
Alternative Therapies
Other therapies that may help to alleviate fibromyalgia pain and symptoms include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Heat treatments
  • Massage
  • Acupuncture
  • Trigger point therapy
  • Myofascial release (a special type of therapy that involves manipulating connective tissue with pressure)
See alternative and complementary therapies for more information about acupuncture and fibromyalgia.




References:
Biofeedback. EBSCO Natural and Alternative Treatments website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/healthLibrary. Updated September 1, 2009. Accessed June 18, 2010.

Fibromyalgia Network website. Available at: http://www.fmnetnews.com.

Kassel K. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). EBSCO Health Library website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/healthLibrary. Updated November 23, 2009. Accessed June 18, 2010.

6/18/2010 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed/what.php: Palermo TM, Eccleston C, et al. Randomized controlled trials of psychological therapies for management of chronic pain in children and adolescents: an updated meta-analytic review. Pain. 2010;148(3):387-397.

2/9/2012 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed: Castro-Sánchez AM, Matarán-Peñarrocha GA, et al. Effects of myofascial release techniques on pain, physical function, and postural stability in patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial. Clin Rehabil. 2011;25(9):800-813.

Last Reviewed September 2014



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