Processes of Care:
Heart Attack

Processes of Care:

    Heart Attack   •  Pneumonia
•  Heart Failure   •  Surgical Infection Prevention

 

Currently, cardiovascular disease -- including Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI), commonly called heart attacks -- is the leading cause of death in the United States. Each year 900,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with AMI; of these, approximately 225,000 cases result in death and, it is estimated that an additional 125,000 patients die before obtaining medical care. The scope of the AMI core measure set was limited to patients 18 years of age and older because the clinical treatment of younger patients is substantially different.

 

A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to part of the heart muscle is severely reduced or blocked. This happens when one of the coronary arteries that supplies blood to the heart is blocked, usually from build up of plaque (deposits of fat-like substances). A heart attack can damage part of the heart, leading to heart failure. However, appropriate treatment of a patient with symptoms of a heart attack can lessen or prevent damage.

 

Heart Attack Measures

SBCH

GVCH

SYVCH

State Average

National Average

Aspirin at Arrival for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)

98%

N/N

N/N

N/N

99%

Aspirin Prescribed at Discharge

98%

N/N

N/N

99%

99%

ACE Inhibitors or ARB for LVSD

100%

N/N

N/N

N/N

97%

Beta Blocker Prescribed at Discharge

98%

N/N

N/N

N/N

99%

Statin Prescribed at Discharge 100% N/N  N/N 98% 98%

PCI Received Within 90 Minutes of Arrival

100%

N/N

N/N

95%

95%

 

N / N = No patients needed this treatment.

CHS data timeframe is 4th  Quarter 2013.
National and State Averages obtained from National Quality Alliance latest reporting timeframe is 2nd Quarter 2012 through 1st Quarter 2013.

*The percentages include only patients whose history and condition indicate the treatment is appropriate.

 

>> See previous 12-month period data chart

 

Measure Definitions

 

Aspirin on Arrival

For patients having or suspected of having a heart attack, early treatment with aspirin can significantly reduce the chance of a fatal heart attack. Patients who are not known to negatively react to aspirin should receive aspirin as soon as possible when admitted to the hospital (preferably chewable aspirin in the emergency department).

 

Aspirin at Discharge

Long-term use of aspirin after a heart attack can significantly reduce the chance of another heart attack or stroke. Your doctor will recommend the proper dosage amount for you.

 

Beta-blockers at Arrival

Beta-blocker medications can relieve high blood pressure and chest pain (angina) and help prevent additional heart attacks. Beta-blocker medications given to patients during the initial hours of a heart attack can lessen the severity of the heart attack and reduce the risk of future heart attacks.

 

Beta-blockers at Discharge

Beta-blocker medications used to treat high blood pressure may be used to relieve chest pain (angina) and can help prevent future heart attacks. For those who have had a heart attack, beta blocker medications are associated with a lower risk of long-term heart disease. Your physician will discuss specific treatment options with you.

 

ACE Inhibitors

Heart attack patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD), a particular form of heart failure, often benefit greatly from receiving Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor (ACEI) therapy. ACE inhibitors help the blood vessels relax, making it easier for the heart to pump blood through them. Recent medical recommendations also include Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB) therapy. Like ACE inhibitors, ARBs allow the vessels to relax which decreases the workload of the heart.

 

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI)

Quickly restoring blood flow to the area of the heart that has lost blood supply is critical during a heart attack. In a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI), a balloon catheter is inserted and inflated to open the restricted coronary artery. Because damage to the heart is less likely when a PCI is performed quickly, Cottage Health System has developed systems that help us respond quickly if a PCI is warranted.

 

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